Tag Archives: marketing

Why is Instagram Hiding Likes?

Last November, Instagram began a test to hide “likes” for U.S. users, and announced that it will be rolling out the change everywhere in the world.

This upset some (really) big influencers including Nicki Minaj who tweeted that she was going to stop posting on the platform because of the decision. She hasn’t posted on her Instagram account since then either.

Based on a survey of 502 consumers poled from The Mainfest, more than half (55%) said they don’t have an opinion regarding Instagram’s decision. About 20% of people supported the decision to hide likes, while 25% oppose the decision.

Instagram CEO, Adam Mosseri  says the move to hide likes is to reduce stress and anxiety on users. They want to try and depressurize the platform and make it less of a competition by giving people more space to focus on connecting with people they love and things that inspire them. Creators will still be able to see like counts on their own posts, but Instagram will not display those publicly.

Interesting that Instagram that is continuing to make follower counts public which is arguably an even more important metric for gauging popularity and traction.

Some believe that Instagram is hiding likes because user engagement has been waning and that the change stems from core business reasons.

Some believe that by hiding likes, Instagram will help alleviate the negative backlash that comes from declining organic engagement on a platform over time as well as protect their reputation as Facebook’s more engaging social media platform. In addition, by making likes private, Instagram will control the flow of that data.

Facebook IQ, What Is It?

Facebook IQ is a culmination of a year’s worth of research and insights. The team explored thousands of topics from January 2018 to June 2019 on Facebook. Where patterns emerged, they looked to third-party research and media sources to inform and validate their findings.
New in 2020, they reported trends beyond the US to 13 new countries in four regions:
Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the
Philippines, Sweden, Thailand and the UK.
For each topic of conversation, they relied on aggregated, anonymized, country-specific data from January 2018 to June 2019 for people ages 18 and older who use Facebook. All topics chosen to be featured grew from June 2018 through June 2019. The topics are presented in the original language as they appeared in their data set.
The analysis covers trends across six categories: Art and Design, Beauty and
Fashion, Entertainment, Food and Drink, Mind and Body and Travel /Leisure.

Facebook IQ 2020 Annual Topics Report delivers insights to understand consumer
behavior, drive more effective marketing and transform the way your business
reaches people. Learning from the billions of people on their platforms and
the millions of businesses that advertise with Facebook, the report provides insights into
behaviors across generations, markets, devices and time.  Click here to read the report.

 

California Consumer Privacy Act

Over the past two years, there are two regulations that have had a major impact on digital marketers – GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) and CCPA (California Consumer Privacy Act). As you probably recall, the EU law went into effect in May 2018 to ensure data protection and privacy for all individuals citizens of the European Union (EU) and the European
Economic Area (EEA) and companies doing business in those areas.
This year, we’re all gearing up for the CCPA. The Act came into effect January 1, 2020, and is reported to be among the most stringent data protection privacy laws in the U.S.
Focusing on the privacy rights of individuals, CCPA regulates the way marketers handle personal
information of California residents. If a business has over $25M in annual revenue, processes (buys, sells, receives, or shares) 50,000 or more California consumer records each year, or earns 50 percent or more of its annual revenue from selling personal information of California residents, it must comply with CCPA. CCPA also applies to companies that share common branding (name, service mark or trademark) with a business that meets the criteria. This includes marketing agencies, online payment processing vendors, and digital marketing
technology companies, for example. If your business doesn’t fall within the criteria outlined above but is a service provider to a company that does fit the criteria, you should still be
knowledgeable about CCPA requirements.
While GDPR’s roots are European and CCPA’s are in California, both regulations have had a ripple effect on businesses around the globe, forcing businesses to provide greater transparency and institute more stringent business processes around customer data.
It’s no wonder when you look at the fines. The fines for failing to comply with GDPR range from 10 million euros to four percent of the company’s annual global turnover, which could add up to billions for some companies. Businesses that don’t comply with CCPA can face a maximum fine of $750 per consumer or violation. For example, if a business collects data from 1,000
California residents without complying with CCPA, they can face fines of up to $750,000. Also, if a business doesn’t meet certain data security requirements, consumers can demand that it be fixed within 30 days or the business risks legal action. Some might think it’s easy to just suppress California contacts from a campaign list but that’s short sighted. Let’s not forget that with a population of 39.5 million, California is the world’s sixth largest economy according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis.
Both GDPR and CCPA have driven digital marketers to update back-end systems, review privacy
statements, update third party contracts, audit contact lists, and confirm subscribers. While these actions can be time consuming and costly, they create opportunities for digital marketers to elevate their presence in customers’ inboxes.
CCPA is the latest example of the rising demand for transparency of collection and management of customer data. We can likely expect other states to follow suit with CCPA and institute even more strict regulations and fines to protect consumers.
Maryland, Mississippi, New York and North Dakota have similar legislation in the works. Though a majority of the new laws copy the structure of the CCPA, there are some notable places where they diverge, which will complicate prospective compliance efforts. The most critical area is
enforcement. CCPA provides a private right of action only for the unauthorized disclosure of
unencrypted, sensitive data.  Massachusetts would extend the private right of action to any violation of its privacy law. Three of the state laws (Mississippi, New Mexico, and Rhode Island) extend a private right of action to any unauthorized disclosure of personal information, regardless of sensitivity of the data and potential risk to consumer.
Similarly, while all these new state laws try to protect consumer privacy, the degree of specificity and format requirements vary, which will likely increase criticisms that privacy policies are written in legalese and too difficult to understand.
The result is that businesses may have to implement multiple layers of protection in privacy policies for consumers in different states, even when the underlying data practices are the same nationally.
The Consumer Bankruptcy database we compile is considered public information which is gathered by the courts and is not subject to the CCPA. The BK data is regulated by the Fair Credit Reporting Act and we are not Credit Reporting Agency.
We will keep you abreast of the ever changing data collection landscape as it continues to unfold.

List Your Close Friends of FB

Facebook says that the goal of News Feed is to connect people with the posts they find most relevant. It’s not about the amount of time someone spends on social site, but rather the quality of time spent. That means Facebook must predict what users want to see.

To do this, they study to understand what people are doing on Facebook — what they like, comment on and share. They also use surveys to get more context about the posts people want to see and who they want to see them from. In May, FB announced two ranking updates based on surveys: one gives priority to friends someone might want to hear from most and the other prioritizes links a person might consider most worthwhile.

Historically FB has predicted who people might want to hear from based on signals like how often they interact with a given friend, how many mutual friends they have and whether they mark someone as a close friend.

Now, in addition to tracking these signals, Facebook is asking users to to list the friends they are closest to.  Once patterns emerge from the results they will use them to inform the News Feed algorithm with the goal to better predict which friends people may want to hear from most.

This doesn’t mean News Feed will be limited to posts from only certain people and it doesn’t mean you will necessarily see more friend content.

They also know that individuals that are considered close friends today may not be in a year, or even a few months later. The prediction models will continuously update based on the interactions people have with their friends on the app as well as continue to survey people.

 

Solar Eclipse is Tomorrow

Tomorrow is also the total eclipse of the sun. It starts at 11:46am, maximum coverage for us to see will be at 1:15pm, and it will be complete by 2:45pm.
The next solar eclipse that can be seen from the US will be in 2024!
Don’t forget to wear protective eye wear if you want to watch it.
Check out this cool video giving you the scoop on why it’s a big deal!
https://youtu.be/7DZ4NrjBGfw

FACEBOOK’S FOUR NEW ADVERTISING SOLUTIONS

facebook-fLast month, Facebook announced 4 new advertising solutions launching in 2016 during the Cannes Lions Festival in Cannes, France.  The focus is on accelerating the shift to mobile advertising as the platform boasts 1.6 billion active users on Facebook and another 500 million on Instagram.  The new solutions include:

  1. Audience Insights Application Program Interface (API)

Facebook partnered with a small group of advertisers, like Mondelez International (an American multinational confectionery, food, and beverage conglomerate based in Illinois which employs about 107,000 people around the world) and Anheuser-Busch InBev (the world’s largest brewer with 25% global market share), to develop insights from composite and unidentified demographics, psychographics, topic data and reports from Facebook IQ. The teams have been able to use these insights to create effective campaigns. The Audience Insights API will be available to partners early next year.

  1. Improvements to Canvas

Introduced last year, Canvas is a post-click, full-screen, immersive mobile ad experience thatartist loads instantaneously.  It is designed to help businesses tell stories and show products on mobile devices in a beautiful way.  Updates include steps to make it easier for marketers to design, create, share and gain insights, the ability to share Canvases with stakeholders to simplify the review process and it will have a new feed unit to help entice people to engage. In addition, Canvas will be available for all Pages to use in a post (even when it’s not promoted as an ad).  Also, marketers will be able to access detailed metrics such as dwell time per component and clicks per component to track performance.

  1. Enhancements to Slideshows

Slideshow ads make it easy for businesses to create videos from photos. It gives the ability to create, edit and promote video ads in seconds and are five times lighter than the average video file, which means they’re ideal to reach people on slow connections.  Audio and text overlay, an easy “video-to-slideshow” creation tool, the ability to create from a mobile device and integration with Pages Photo Library and Shutterstock image library are the latest enhancements.  These tools will be available to all advertisers and can be used however you would use a video.

  1. Introduction of Creative Hub

People consume content on mobile in fundamentally different ways than they do on other channels. Creative Hub is an online interface, a “sandbox” where agencies can test different ad formats for online and mobile and experiment with what works best. In the past, most ad creation happens on desktop, but that is changing fast and Creative Hub’s experience is for a mobile device. The Creative Hub gives ad creators an easy way to preview their work in a dynamic mobile feed. They can also share mock-ups through a preview URL.

The Creative Hub is currently in test mode and should be available to everyone later in the year.

Facebook for small business continues to change almost daily.  We’ll (try) to keep you abreast of the latest updates and opportunities as we learn them.

For more details, be sure to check out our Marketing for Small Business Classes too.  We offer two curriculum, The Basics and Intermediate.

The Basics course was specifically created for business owners and staff that are branching out their marketing to include digital.  The course includes four, 90-minute classes over four weeks.  Classes include Blogging, Social Media, Email Marketing, Direct Mail Marketing and Organic Search Engine Optimization.

The Intermediate courses (also four, 90-minute classes over four weeks) are: HOW TO: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Constant Contact.  Check out details, dates and pricing here.

Welcome Nina Cannady

Nina Cannady

Nina Cannady

Welcome Nina Cannady!  Nina recently moved back to Houston after living in Anchorage, Alaska.  A graduate of Benny Benson Secondary School, Nina studied accounting at the University of Alaska-Anchorage.  Nina has three sons, Maties (12), Jaiquin (5), and    Lamont (2).

Nina handles A/R and other accounting functions as well as managing the day-to-day office happenings.  Welcome to the family Nina!